Failed Coup of a Failing Establishment

Adam Schiff, Jerrold Nadler It has been a bad few days for the establishment, really bad. In a 51-49 vote, the Senate refused to call witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump and agreed to end the trial Wednesday, with a near-certain majority vote to acquit the president of all charges. As weekend polls show socialist Bernie Sanders surging into the lead for the nomination in the states of Iowa, New Hampshire and California, the sense of panic among Democratic Party elites is palpable. Former Secretary of State and Joe Biden surrogate John Kerry was overheard Sunday at a Read More

Is Mass Civil Disobedience Our Future?

People line up outside the capitol before a pro gun rally, Monday, Jan. 20, 2020, in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) On the holiday set aside in 2020 to honor Martin Luther King, the premier advocate of nonviolent Gandhian civil disobedience, thousands of gun owners gathered in Richmond to petition peacefully for their rights. King had preached that there was a higher law that justified breaking existing laws that mandated racial segregation. When Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat in the front of the bus in Montgomery, when Freedom Riders integrated bus terminals, when black students sat at segregated lunch Read More

A Malicious Indictment Mitch Should Toss Out

About the impeachment of President Donald Trump she engineered with her Democratic majority, Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday: “It’s not personal. It’s not political. It’s not partisan. It’s patriotic.” Seriously, Madam Speaker? Not political? Not partisan? Why then were all eight House members chosen as managers to prosecute the case against Trump, who ceremoniously escorted the articles across the Capitol, all Democrats? Why did the articles of impeachment receive not a single Republican vote on the House floor? The truth: The impeachment of Donald Trump is the fruit of a malicious prosecution whose roots go back to Read More

Our Real Existential Crisis — Extinction

If Western elites were asked to name the greatest crisis facing mankind, climate change would win in a walk. Thus did Time magazine pass over every world leader to name a Swedish teenage climate activist, Greta Thunberg, its person of the year. On New Year’s Day, the headline over yet another story in The Washington Post admonished us anew: “A Lost Decade for Climate Action: We Can’t Afford A Repeat, Scientists Warn.” “By the final year of the decade,” said the Post, “the planet had surpassed its 2010 temperature record five times. “Hurricanes devastated New Jersey and Puerto Rico, Read More

Today France, Tomorrow the USA?

Protesters light flares during a march in Marseille, southern France, Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2019. Workers at the Eiffel Tower, teachers, doctors, lawyers and people from across the French workforce walked off the job Tuesday to resist a higher retirement age, or to preserve a welfare system they fear their business-friendly president wants to dismantle. (AP Photo/Daniel Cole) As that rail and subway strike continued to paralyze travel in Paris and across France into the third week, President Emmanuel Macron made a Christmas appeal to his dissatisfied countrymen: “Strike action is justifiable and protected by the constitution, but I think there are Read More

Where Are the ‘High Crimes’?

“Quid pro quo” was the accusatory Latin phrase most often used to describe President Donald Trump’s July 25 phone call asking for a “favor” from the president of Ukraine. New Year’s prediction: The Roman poet Horace’s Latin depiction: “Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus” — “The mountains went into labor, and brought forth a mouse” — will be used to describe the articles of impeachment drawn up by Nancy Pelosi’s House. Article II is titled “Obstruction of Congress.” What does it allege? That Trump “directed the unprecedented, categorical, and indiscriminate defiance of subpoenas issued by the House of Representatives pursuant Read More

Democrats’ Diversity — Only in the Back of the Bus

The “Our diversity is our strength!” Party is starting to look rather monochromatic in its upper echelons these days. The four leading candidates for its presidential nomination — Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Pete Buttigieg — are all white. The six candidates who have qualified for the Dec. 19 debate — the front four, plus Amy Klobuchar and Tom Steyer — are all white. Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democratic Majority Leader Steny Hoyer are both white, as are Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Whip Dick Durbin. The chairs of the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees managing impeachment, Adam Schiff and Jerry Read More

In Hong Kong, It’s US vs. China Now

Protesters with umbrellas run after tear gas fired in Hong Kong on Monday, Nov. 11, 2019. A protester was shot by police Monday in a dramatic scene caught on video as demonstrators blocked train lines and roads during the morning commute. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) At first glance, it would appear that five months of pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong had produced a stunning triumph. By September, the proposal of city leader Carrie Lam that ignited the protests — to allow criminal suspects to be extradited to China for trial — had been withdrawn. And though the protesters’ demands escalated along with their tactics, Read More

Is NATO, 70, Brain Dead?

A week from now, the 29 member states of “the most successful alliance in history” will meet to celebrate its 70th anniversary. Yet all is not well within NATO. Instead of a “summit,” the gathering, on the outskirts of London, has been cut to two days. Why the shortened agenda? Among the reasons, apprehension that President Donald Trump might use the occasion to disrupt alliance comity by again berating the Europeans for freeloading on the U.S. defense budget. French President Emanuel Macron, on the 100th anniversary of the World War I Armistice, described NATO as having suffered “brain death.” Macron Read More

What’s Behind Our World on Fire?

Crews work a burning hillside caused by the Getty fire on Mandeville Canyon Monday, Oct. 28, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) When the wildfires of California broke out across the Golden State, many were the causes given. Negligence by campers. Falling power lines. Arson. A dried-out land. Climate change. Failure to manage forests, prune trees and clear debris, leaving fuel for blazes ignited. Abnormally high winds spreading the flames. Too many fires for first responders to handle. So, too, there appears to be a multiplicity of causes igniting and fueling the protests and riots sweeping capital cities across Read More